Current Faculty Fellows

Moran Bercovici

Moran Bercovici

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology
UT Austin host: Department of Mechanical Engineering

The unique physics of fluids at the microscale holds both challenges in the understating of basic physical phenomena and opportunities in leveraging these phenomena toward new technologies. Professor Bercovici's research combines experimental, analytical, and computational tools to study microfluidic problems characterized by coupling between fluid mechanics, heat transfer, electric fields, chemical reactions, and biological processes. His current research focuses on engineering electro-viscous-elastic interactions, thermocapillary flows, and superhydrophobic surfaces to create new technologies for microscale flow control, adaptive optics, 3D printing, biosensing, and single cell analysis.

Lailea Noel

Lailea Noel

New York University
UT Austin host: Steve Hicks School of Social Work

Professor Noel’s research investigates the social and economic conditions that contribute to lower cancer treatment utilization and higher mortality rates in marginalized communities, particularly communities of color, and communities within residentially segregated urban and rural neighborhoods. She has a passion for conducting community-based participatory research and has a wealth of experience engaging communities, social scientists and medical professionals in such research partnerships. As a Harrington Fellow, she will participate in the Steve Hicks School of Social Work’s ongoing collaboration with the Dell Medical School LIVESTRONG Cancer Institutes in an effort to decrease barriers to the timely initiation of cancer care.

Stephanie Jones-Rogers

Stephanie Jones-Rogers

University of California-Berkeley
UT Austin host: Department of History

Professor Jones-Rogers’s research focuses primarily upon gender and American slavery, but she is equally fascinated with colonial and 19th century legal and economic history, especially as it pertains to women, systems of bondage, and the domestic slave trade. She is currently working on her second book project which explores the ways white women used nineteenth century property laws to invest in the expansion of slavery into the West.